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January 1, 2009

What a great way to start off the New Year by taking the dogs to the park for a nice walk, or so I thought!

Once again people obviously need a reminder of the rules at LMP. Yes, another incident occurred, which included three dogs chasing my dog into a tree and of course he sustained an injury.

First of all, I admit to not handing the situation to the best of my ability and yes I ended up yelling at the woman since she obviously needed and deserved it !

Instead of an apology and asking if my dog was Ok she decided to babble on an on about how the situation required me to be calm as my dog literally cried in pain for what seemed like a solid minute. I was attempting to physically check him out and calm him while pushing her dogs away from my injured dog. She was told by other members of our group to get her dogs on leashes since she wasn't able to verbally call off her dogs. Surprise, she had NO LEASHES with her. Instead she had the audacity to put the blame on our group of dogs and took no responsibility for her own dogs and their aggressive behavior.

Well after all was said and done, and my dog limped for the rest of the walk back to the vehicle, I thought how do we enforce the rules so these situations do not occur ? If there are any ideas I would gladly help so my fur babies can have an enjoyable time instead of traumatic with injuries.

As a last note, regarding the on-line vote, ( even though I personally have been voting for the entire park), obviously with these situations occuring I see now how it would be a very bad idea. In my opinion there should be more areas designated as off leash and a suggestion would be to add the south east back field by the golf course.

I would appreciate if you could post this on the site

Thanks

Rhonda B.

Here is a collection of the First Dogs. They are not in any order, ( at least not yet ). Story taken from the Winnipeg Free Press Dec. 28/ 08 by Lee-Anne Goodman.

For a excellent photo spread go to :

www.time.com/time/photogallery/0,29307,1830236_1746240,00.html

" If you want a friend in Washington, get a dog ", Harry S. Truman.

" Any man who does not like dogs and want them about does not deserve to be in the White House", Calvin Coolidge.

B. Obama - April 13 2009 - enter Bo, a Portuguese Water Dog

G.W. Bush - Barney, Miss Beazley, Scot Terrier's

B. Clinton - Buddy, a chocolate Lab.

George H.W. Bush - Millie , a Springer Spaniel

Ronald Reagan - Lucky, Bouvier Des Flandres

Gerard Ford - Liberty a Golden Retriever

Richard Nixon - Vicky a Poodle, Checkers a Cocker Spaniel , Pasha a Terrier and King Timahoe, a Irish Settter

Abraham Lincoln - Fido, a mutt

John F. Kennedy - 9 dogs, two of the mutts, Wolf and Pushinka

Robert F. Kennedy - Brumus, Newfoundland

John Tayler - Le Beau, an Italian Greyhound

James Buchanan - Lara, Newfoundland

Ulysses S. Grant - Faithful, Newfoundland

Rutherford B. Hayes - Hector, Newfoundland , Dog, a Cocker Spaniel

Franklin D. Roosevelt - Fala and Meggie. Scottish Terriers ( Fala is shown in the Roosevelt Memorial)

George Washington - 7 dogs, four black and tan Coonhounds named Taster,Tipler,Tipsy and Drunkard. He also was one of the developers the American Foxhound breed.

John Adams - Satan unknown breed

Lyndon B. Johnson - 4 Beagles named Beagle, Little Beagle, Him and Her, Yuki a mutt

Harry S. Truman - Feller a Cocker Spaniel

Herbert Hoover - Had 10 dogs including, King Tut, a German Sheppard, Two Fox Terriers, Big Ben and Sonnie, Norwegian Elkhound Weegie and a Irish Wolfhound named Patrick

Calvin Coolidge - two White Collies named Rob Roy and Prudence Prim

Warren G. Harding - had a Airedale Terrier named Laddie Boy

 

 

My trip to Wal-Mart

Yesterday I was at my local Wal-Mart buying a large bag of Purina dog chow for my loyal pet, Biscuit, the Wonder Dog and was in the checkout line when a woman behind me asked if I had a dog ? What did she think I had, an Elephant? So since I'm retired and have little to do, on impulse I told her that no, I didn't have a dog, I was starting the Purina Diet again. I added that I probably shouldn't, because I ended up in the hospital last time, but that I'd lost 50 pounds before I awakened in an intensive care ward with tubes coming out of most of my orifices and IVs in both arms.

I told her that it was essentially a perfect diet and that the way that it works is to load your pants pockets with Purina nuggets and simply eat one or two every time you feel hungry. The food is nutritionally complete so it works well and I was going to try it again. ( I have to mention here that practically everyone in line was now enthralled with my story.) Horrified, she asked if I ended up inintensive care because the dog food poisoned me. I told her, no, I stepped off a curb to sniff an Irish Setter's butt and a car hit us both.

I thought the guy behind her was going to have a heart attack he was laughing so hard. Wal-Mart won't let me shop there anymore.

Better watch what you ask retired people. They have all the time in the world to think of crazy things to say. 

 It's a romantic full moon, when Pedro said, " Hey, mamacita, let's do Weeweechu."

"Oh no, not now, let's look at the moon!" said Rosita.

"Oh, c'mon baby, let's you and I do Weeweechu. I love you and it's the perfect time, time," Pedro begged.

" But I wanna just hold your hand and watch the moon." replied Rosita.

" Please, corazoncito, just once, do Weeweechu with me."

Rosita looked at Pedro and said, " Ok, one time, we'll do Weeweechu."

Pedro grabbed his guitar and they both sang ....

" Weeweechu a Merry Christmas, Weeweechu a Merry Christmas, Weeweechu a Merry Christmas, and a Happy New Year."

Merry Christmas to all !!!

The Chai Story

http://thechaistory.blogspot.com/2008/08/chai-story.html

On Sunday, June 22, 2008 my 10 year old lab mix, Chai, sustained a severe injury from a product that the company Four Paws Inc, produces. The toy I'm referencing is the pimple ball with bell. ( Item # 20227-001,UPC Code 0 4566320227 9)

While chewing on the toy, a vacuum was created and it effectively sucked his tongue into the hole in the ball. From speaking with my vet, this likely occurred because there is not a second hole in the ball preventing the vacuum effect from happening. I became aware of this when Chai approached a friend at my home whipering with the ball in his mouth. She tried unsuccessfully to remove the ball but the tougue had swollen and could not be released.

Chai was taken to the Animal Medical Center( an emergency care facility in New York City) and was treated by Dr. Nicole Spurlock to have the ball removed. Because the size of the opening on the ball was so small, all circulation to his tongue was cut off. The doctors had to sedate him in order to remove it. Once the ball was removed, his tongue swelled to the point that he could no longer put it in his mouth. Chai was sent home with care instructions and to be observed overnight for any changes.

By the following morning Chai's tongue had swollen even more.

 He was taken to his regular vet, Dr. Timnah Lee, fot treatment. He was admitted and kept sedated for a period of three days durning which time they were treating his wounds and waiting to determine how much of his tongue could be saved. On June 26, 2008 Chai had his tongue amputated.

He was kept in after-care for an additional three days. On Sunday June 29th I brought Chai home from the vet with a barrage of home careinstructions, to last for an additional 7 days. His next visit was to have his mouth re-examined and have the feeding tube in his neck removed.

On the way home from the vet we stopped at Petland Discount where I purchased their product to speak to the manager on duty. Upon meeting Chai and seeing his condition, he removed all of the balls in question from the shelves. He also gave me the customer service number to their corporate headquaters to request that they refuse to continue purchasing all Four Paws products, but I have not called them as of yet.

Additionally, I shared my story with friends who have a French Bulldog named Petunia. Upon hearing my story their eyes widened. They explained that the same thing happened twice in one night with a smaller version of the same ball to the their dog. Fortunately, they were able to pull it off before the tongue swelled, but not without tremendous effort and pain to the dog.

They recalled how horrific it was to hear thier dog screaming while they had to pry the ball from her tongue.

To date, my veterinary bills total over $ 5000.00 and I will have regular follow up appointments for some time. Additionally, Chai now requires a much more expensive form of food because of this injury, averaging approximately $200 per month.

Also - I am Chai's sole caretaker and the regime required to care for him following his surgery has forced me to lose a great deal of business. I am a hair stylist and my salon is in my home. Given that Chai needs constant attention, and given that he has ben wailing in pain, I have not been able to see clients.

Additionally, I now have to re-teach my dog to eat, drink and adjust to life without his tongue. Just walking him requires about 30min twice a day and we only make it three blocks. Feeding him takes me about 90 minutes twice a day and for at least this first week he is not to be unattended for more than 20 minutes at a time.

The following is a link to an animal treatment clinic that has also documented the same injury to a Shepard mix.

www.logcabinanimalhospital.com/index.php/toy-ball-stuck-on-dogs-tongue/

I sent this information along with the references to Petunia the french bulldog to Four Paws Inc, and it is their postion that there just aren't enough instances to do anything about this. I told their Insurance company's case manager that was not a good enough excuse, it was inferred that my dogs value wasn't much and that his pain and suffering don't count as he is just a piece of property.

Valour, the Story of a Chained Dog

Valour could feel the life ebbing from his frail body. it was - 30 with the wind chill. His chain kept him prisoner, and held him fast. He was surrounded by his own excrement, and his dog house was tipped over and out of reach, so there was nothing to shield him from the bitterness of winter.

He could see the house, knowing there was warth within, but his howls fell on deaf ears. Nobody came to his aid. Nobody cared. After all, he was just a dog.

It had been this way since he was a pup. They brought him home, and chained him to the dog house. In the beginning, the little boy came out to play with him, but soon tired of him, and the only human contact he had was the master filling his dishes with water and a cheap, tasteless dog food a couple of times a week. There was never as much as a pat on the head. In the winter he never got fresh water, he had to eat snow ... and that snow was usually fouled by his own waste. The endless hours of boredom drove him to the brink of insanity. He often chewed on his paws until they bled.

Now, he could feel the pain and misery was coming to an end. As the cold finally sapped his life's breath away, Valour felt warm for the first time in his life. He went to sleep.

Valour blinked. What was this ? Warmth. Blankets. He lifted his head. He was lying on a bed. No... IN a bed. Morning sunlight spilled across the quilt that covered him. Panic. Where am I ? He heard a dog howling outside the window. It sent a chill up his spine; it was so filled with despair and fear. He suddenly had awareness that something very strange and magical had transpired in the deep cold of the winter night. He was given awareness ... Valour had switched places with the Master.

He leaped out of bed in his human body, strangely not awkward, but as though he had been this way his whole life. He looked out the bedroom window. There, chained to the dog house outside was the Master, in Valour's old body.He was shivering, crying and desperate to be relieved of his huger, loneliness and cold.

Valour gripped the window sill, his knuckles turning white. His eyes narrowed as he looked out upon the Master. He was overcome with righteous anger.

He strode purposefully into the kitchen, his eyes darting about, taking in everything. There ... he found what he was looking for. He reached over and pulled the sharpest knife out of the knife block on the counter. He gripped it tightly, and made his way to the door. In bare feet and pyjamas, he trudged through the snow towards the Master. The Master cowered, shivering, fearing what was to come. Valour grasped the Master, placed the knife between his throat and the collar. The Master screamed in terror. Valour jerked the knife upwards with one violent thrust. The knife severed the collar, and along with the chain, it fell to the ground with a dull thud. Picking the Master up and cradling him in his arms, he made his way back to the house. He kicked the door open and carried him over to the fireplace to warm him. He fed him, and gave him clean water. He then covered him with a blanket, and sat beside him, saying nothing, but stroking his head thoughtfully.

You see, Valour had been given the brain and body of a man, but he still had the heart of a dog, a heart that beat with compassion, love and a forgiveness beyond human comprehension.

 

Copyright Sally Hull 2007

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